Most service providers provide statistics, often via an online portal. Customers can verify that SLAs are being met and that they are entitled to service credits or other penalties in accordance with the SLA. For the SLA to have a « bite », the lack of a level of service must have financial consequences for the service provider. This is most often done through the inclusion of a credit system for services. In essence, where the service provider does not meet the agreed performance standards, the service provider pays or credits the customer an agreed amount to encourage performance improvement. These service credits can be measured in different ways. For example, if the 99.5% level for reporting is not reached, the SLA could include a service credit that grants some price reduction for each 0.5% discount per week. Alternatively, service credits can be awarded if, for example, there are three or more errors to fulfill a service level within a certain period of time. Here too, each level of service must be considered individually and a reasonable level of credit must be agreed between the provider and the customer if the agreed level is not reached over a given period. It is important to ensure that service credits are appropriate and encourage the service provider to do better, and that they intervene early enough to make a difference. Define an appropriate baseline.

Defining the right metrics is only half the way. To be useful, metrics must be tailored to a reasonable and achievable level of performance. If strong historical measurement data is not available, you should be prepared to check and adjust the parameters later by a predefined process defined in the SLA. Define carefully. A vendor can optimize SLA definitions to ensure that they are met. For example, metrik Incident Response Time must ensure that the provider responds to an incident within a minimum of minutes. However, some vendors may fulfill the SLA 100% by providing an automated response to an incident report. Clients should clearly define LSAs to represent the intent of the service level. In addition to defining the services to be provided, the contract should also document how the services are to be monitored, including how the data is collected and disclosed, how often it is verified and who is involved in the verification.

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